Displaying 2 category results for March 2014.x

Target of social media criticism can sue for defamation, Oregon Court of Appeals holds

By Lori Irish Bauman
March 31, 2014

The Oregon Court of Appeals recently held that a business owner can pursue a defamation claim against an individual who posted a negative on-line review.  In Neumann v. Liles, plaintiff, who operates a wedding venue, was the target of a review on google.com calling her, among other things, "two faced, crooked, and . . . rude."  She sued the author of the review, who had been a guest at a wedding hosted at plaintiff's venue.

The on-line critic in response filed a "special motion to strike" under Oregon's SLAPP statute.  SLAPP stands for "strategic lawsuit against public participation," and the anti-SLAPP statute creates a procedure for dismissing at an early stage an unfounded lawsuit designed to quash speech or activism on issues of public interest.  While the statute protects certain speech-related activities, it does not shield defendants who engage in defamatory speech. 

According to the Court of Appeals, the trial court should not have granted the anti-SLAPP motion to strike the complaint because plaintiff had offered sufficient evidence that the review was in fact defamatory.  While defendant claimed that the review represented his opinion and was merely "figurative, rhetorical, or hyperbolic," the Court of Appeals concluded that most of the post was "nonrhetorical and factual" and contained specific, potentially defamatory, statements about plaintiff's honesty and business ethics.  Accordingly, the trial court should have allowed the case to proceed to trial.

Oregon Supreme Court addresses seller's UCC remedies

By Lori Irish Bauman
March 28, 2014

When a party refuses to perform its contract to purchase goods, the Uniform Commercial Code entitles the aggrieved seller to sell the goods to another buyer and recover damages from the defaulting party.  Often the seller must sell at less than the contract price and then recover as damages the different between the unpaid contract price and the resale price.  The UCC offers as an alternative measure of damages the difference between the contract price and the market price for the goods.

What the UCC does not make clear is whether the seller may recover the difference between the unpaid contract price and the market price in circumstances where the market price damages would exceed resale price damages.  Last week the Oregon Supreme Court held that the jilted seller may in fact recover market price damages, even if those damages would cause the seller to recover more than the actual loss suffered. 

In Peace River Seed Co-operative, Ltd. v. Proseeds Marketing, Inc., the court considered the relevant text, context and legislative history to conclude that "an aggrieved seller can seek [market price] damages even if the seller has resold the goods and market price damages exceed resale price damages."  The court noted that a fixed price contract always requires the parties to bear the risk of market price fluctuations.  Subjecting the buyer to damages based on market price is consistent with that risk.