What's the Fuss About Electronic Discovery?

By Anna Jeno
April 8, 2015

The decade-old Zubulake v. UBS case set off a seismic shift in electronic discovery that many lawyers and litigants still don't fully comprehend.  One lesson many have learned the hard way is that the electronic discovery rules and practices that have been developed post-Zubulake must be a regular part of every organization's document management plans.

Zubulake was a standard employment discrimination lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York that is now seen as a turning point in electronic discovery.  This article provides an excellent summary of Zubulake and its impact. 

Increasingly, courts are disinclined to tolerate a party's failure to work cooperatively to minimize the cost of eDiscovery, as this plaintiff painfully discovered.   

Give just a moment to consider your organization’s electronic document protocols. Processes should be in place long before any subpoena or request for records arrives.  When your organization is hit with a lawsuit, what is the plan for preserving, requesting, organizing and producing documents? 

The Litigation Technology Team at Ater Wynne manages electronic documents and eDiscovery for clients in litigation of all sizes, from small document collections with just one or two file types to large, complex sets involving terabytes of data, millions of documents, and dozens of file types.  We utilize protocols and best practices developed in-house and multiple eDiscovery software platforms, keeping document management practices up-to-date and satisfying the courts' requirements.

In matters of eDiscovery, an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.  For more information about Ater Wynne’s Litigation Technology Team, contact Kara Lindsay, Chief Litigation Technology Specialist at kzl@aterwynne.com.

NLRB issues further guidance on employment policies

By Stacey Mark
March 22, 2015

On March 18, 2015, the General Counsel for the NLRB issued a new memo providing guidance on common employer rules and policies that run afoul of Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act.  The memo is divided into two parts.  In the first, the NLRB compares rules it found lawful with those that are unlawful, and provides its reasoning for both conclusions. The section includes employer rules that are frequently at issue before the agency, addressing issues such as:

  • Confidentiality
  • Professionalism and harassment
  • Communication with the media
  • Restrictions on the use of company logos, copyrights, and trademarks
  • Prohibitions on photography and recording (including the possession and use of personal recording devices)
  • Restrictions on leaving work
  • Conflicts of interest

The second section of the memo addresses handbook rules from a recently settled unfair labor practice charge against Wendy's International LLC, which followed an initial determination by the NLRB that several of Wendy's handbook rules were unlawful.  

Consistently with prior GC memos, the differences between rules and policies the NLRB found lawful and unlawful were not always obvious, or even consistent with each other or past interpretations.   Nevertheless, the memo is worth reviewing as a summary of the NLRB's current thinking and should serve as a reminder to employers that, if they have not updated their handbooks in a while, this is a good time to do it.  

Employers that take such advice to heart should also keep in mind the NLRB's recent reversal of the longstanding precedent under which employers were permitted to ban employees from using the company's email system for non-business purposes.   In Purple Communications, Inc., decided December 11, 2014, the NLRB held that employers given access to the company's email system must be permitted to use the system for communications protected under Section 7 during non-working time, unless the employer can show that special circumstances exist (most will not be able to make the required showing).

You can review our previous coverage of NLRB actions on rules, policies, and settlement terms here and here and here.  You can also find more in depth coverage on our website, here (see part 7, Employer Confidentiality Policies Under Attack by Federal Agencies).